fbpx

5 Rules for Graphic Design

By Austin McDade | Creative

Mar 27
Starfish Ad Agency Programmatic ads Longview Tyler Dallas Shreveport Digital Unplugged Marketing

Whenever you are working with text it can be easy to just crank down the leading to make the text take up the least amount of space possible, but you want to make sure that there is enough leading between the tallest part of the line below and the lowest part of the line above to ensure that there’s nothing touching. There should be enough room for you to be able to run a line between them without it touching either one. This rule is more flexible when you’re designing logos because they usually only have a handful of words as opposed to a full paragraph, and sometimes you can play off of the letters touching.
When choosing text do not make every font stylized otherwise they’ll be fighting for the viewers’ attention, you want to only choose a maximum of three fonts. For your primary font, you can choose whichever style you want, this will be the attention piece of your design. For the secondary font, choose on that is more readable that you would use for a paragraph heading. This font should be what grabs the viewers attention after they’ve read everything you want at the forefront. And for the third font, you should choose something easy to read in bulk because this will be what you use for all the lengthy content. The font you chose should be simple to provide a visual break from the previous two.
When working with colors never choose all fully saturated colors, choose one or two colors that you really want to stand out then choose more subdued colors from there. Start by choosing any color you’d like, preferably not a fully saturated color like 100% red, but your mileage may vary. For your next color, choose something complimentary to the first one, while keeping the saturation under around 70%. And for your final color, it should be something plain in comparison to the others, this will be the color you use most so it shouldn’t take away from your primary.
Never use two fully saturated colors on top of each other when it comes to text, a common example would be red on blue or vice versa. When you have two colors like those right next to each other, they create a visual tension that makes it almost impossible for the viewer to read. Another example would be when you are designing for people above 60 years of age, or who have poorer eyesight. In that case, you should try to avoid white text on a black background because when they look at it the black constricts the white type. So to counter this you should choose a nearly white background for your text so that it doesn’t have to fight for dominance.
Finally, you shouldn’t leave visual elements too close to the edge of your design. This creates a visual tension that either leads the viewer’s eyes off the design or makes it harder for them to focus on anything else in the design. You should keep all elements within a good distance of the edge, anything that leads off the page should be intentional. An example would be if you are trying to lead the viewer through the current design and guide them into the next.
These are just some examples of the ways that our graphic design team ensures quality work for their projects. They are very precise when it comes to details, and they keep the client and their target audience in mind with their designs. If you want to know more, contact us about taking your marketing to the next level.